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Opportunities and Obstacles for American Aquaculture

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According to the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization, world aquaculture production tripled in the past 20 years, representing the fastest growing food-producing sector. Last year, global aquaculture exceeded wild-capture fisheries. The vast majority of aquaculture production takes place in Asia, with the greatest growth currently registered in Africa and South and Central America, while the U.S. remains a major importer of seafood. Despite all the advantages of developing a domestic marine aquaculture industry in the U.S.—from environmental benefits, sustainable supply, food security, and an increase in both high-tech jobs as well as year-round employment opportunities for fishermen and processors—advancing aquaculture still needs to address permit paralysis due to a maze of laws, jurisdictions and agencies; sourcing and seafood transparency practices; and pollution, escapement, and impacts on the environment. From Maine to the Gulf of Mexico, California to Washington and Hawaii, the potential to grow a domestic supply of sustainable seafood and supplement the wild-capture fisheries remains at a standstill. CHOW 2016 will explore promising solutions and the continued obstacles for a growing domestic industry to see if the U.S. can become the global leader in sustainable marine aquaculture production.

 

Moderator: 

Dawn M Martin | Vice Chair and Treasurer, National Marine Sanctuary Foundation

Discussants:

Scott Nichols, Ph.D. | Founder and CEO, Food’s Future

Alan Cook | Vice President for Aquaculture, Icicle Seafoods, Inc.

Kevan L. Main, Ph.D. | Senior Scientist, Mote Marine Laboratory

Lisa Tucker | Seafood Watch Aquaculture Program Manager, Monterey Bay Aquarium

Harlon H. Pearce | Chairman, Gulf Seafood Institute and Managing Member, Harlon's LA Fish

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